Blog Navigation

What Is A Dead Zone?


A dead zone is a geographical area where cell phones have no reception. In a dead zone, you can’t make or receive calls, texts or most forms of data (the exception being GPS or GPRS data, as we’ll discuss later). The size of a dead zone can vary from a small pocket of terrain in an urban area to vast rural spaces where cell phone coverage is poor or non-existent.

What causes dead zones? Cell phones operate by communicating with transmitting stations known as repeaters, each of which covers a specific geographic area. These areas are known as “cells” since they join together in covering a much wider region – hence the name “cell phone’. When you move from one cell to another, your phone’s connection gets transferred from one repeater to the next, usually without any disruption. However, there are often gaps between the cells where your phone can’t contact a repeater, resulting in dead zones where you have no reception. The other main cause of dead zones is environmental disruption: thick concrete (such as in train tunnels), valleys and electrical interference can all cut off your reception in certain areas. Given their typically small size in urban environments, dead zones often lead to “dropped calls” when the cell phone user passes through a zone and has their call cut off.

There are a number of ways to provide reception in dead zones. Private repeaters can be bought for both businesses and individuals to address dead zones that encompass office-blocks or houses. However, these are often expensive and difficult to install without technical experience, making them a tool of last resort for most. GPS and GPRS data-streaming is another option in rural dead zones, since the required satellites can cover areas without local repeaters. Nonetheless, dead zones remain an annoyance and occasional safety hazard of cell phone reliance.

Related posts:

  1. Researching the Best Cell Coverage for You
  2. Call Reception Good With CMDA Cell Phones?
  3. Who Has the Best Coverage in South Dakota?
  4. Tri Band vs. Quad Band: Which Do You Need?
  5. 4G AWS Signal Booster Introduced by Wilson
  6. Ugly Mobile: Don’t Be Caught Dead with these Hideous Cell Phones
  7. Why are Calls Dropped?
  8. Coverage Problems, Why Some Areas Have Them
  9. T-Mobile United States Expanding Their Mobile Broadband Network
  10. The Expected Consumer Effects of the FCC’s New National Broadband Plan

Tags: , , ,

Leave a Reply

Entries (RSS) and Comments (RSS).

Additional Blog Links

Archives

  • November 2013
  • October 2013
  • August 2013
  • July 2013
  • March 2013
  • September 2012
  • August 2012
  • July 2012
  • April 2012
  • March 2012
  • February 2012
  • January 2012
  • December 2011
  • November 2011
  • October 2011
  • September 2011
  • August 2011
  • July 2011
  • June 2011
  • May 2011
  • April 2011
  • March 2011
  • February 2011
  • January 2011
  • December 2010
  • November 2010
  • October 2010
  • September 2010
  • August 2010
  • July 2010
  • June 2010
  • May 2010
  • April 2010
  • March 2010
  • February 2010
  • January 2010
  • December 2009
  • November 2009
  • October 2009
  • September 2009
  • August 2009
  • July 2009
  • June 2009
  • May 2009
  • March 2009
  • February 2009
  • October 2008
  • August 2008
  • April 2008
  • December 2007
  • November 2007
  • Categories
  • 2048 Bit SSL Certificate